Accessibility

Complementary and Alternative Treatments for Autism

AccessTech News - Mon, 05/02/2011 - 08:42

 

Autism is a disorder with no known cause or cure. Parents and advocates of children with ASD will understandably pursue interventions and treatments that offer the possibility of helping the student, particularly if they are perceived as unlikely to have any adverse effects.

Complementary and Alternative Treatments for Autism
Sat, 30 Apr 2011 22:09:08 GMT


Filed under: Autism, Treatment
Categories: Accessibility

With Child Autism, Listen to Your Intuition

AccessTech News - Mon, 05/02/2011 - 08:39

 

Many parents find themselves in the difficult and sometimes heart-wrenching position of asking, "Does my child have autism?" Coming to the realization that your child may be autistic is the first hurdle in a long race.

With Child Autism, Listen to Your Intuition
Sat, 30 Apr 2011 18:59:27 GMT


Filed under: Autism, Parenting
Categories: Accessibility

Autism info at Yale Child Study Center

AccessTech News - Mon, 05/02/2011 - 08:36

 

The Yale Child Study Center is celebrating its 100th birthday this year. The center is a pioneer in health care issues affecting children.

Autism info at Yale Child Study Center
Sat, 30 Apr 2011 09:40:28 GMT


Filed under: Autism, Information
Categories: Accessibility

Courses offer autism help

AccessTech News - Mon, 05/02/2011 - 08:33

 

COURSES are on offer for people who work with children or adults with autism or Asperger’s syndrome.

Courses offer autism help
Fri, 29 Apr 2011 16:02:18 GMT


Filed under: Asperger Syndrome, Autism, Training
Categories: Accessibility

Research Suggests Benefits For Postponing 18 Month Autism Screen Until 30 Months For Very Preterm Infants

AccessTech News - Mon, 05/02/2011 - 08:31

 

Extremely premature infants who screen positive for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) at 18 months of age may not actually have autism. Rather, they may fail screening tests due to an unrelated cognitive or language delay, according to research to be presented Sunday, May 1, at the Pediatric Academic Societies (PAS) annual meeting in Denver. An estimated one in 110 U.S…

Research Suggests Benefits For Postponing 18 Month Autism Screen Until 30 Months For Very Preterm Infants
Sun, 01 May 2011 10:00:00 GMT


Filed under: Autism, Research
Categories: Accessibility

Checklist May Help Identify Autism Earlier On In Life

AccessTech News - Mon, 05/02/2011 - 08:31

 

Identifying autism as early in life as possible increases the chances of being treated sooner, which improves a child’s subsequent learning and development. A new checklist that only takes five minutes for parents to complete at doctor’s waiting rooms might well help do this, researchers from the University of California, San Diego, reported in the Journal of Pediatrics…

Checklist May Help Identify Autism Earlier On In Life
Sun, 01 May 2011 08:00:00 GMT


Filed under: Autism
Categories: Accessibility

Words without boundaries, Serotek’s DocuScan Plus OCR Goes<br>Multi-Platform With Support For The Mac

AccessTech News - Mon, 05/02/2011 - 08:25

 

Minneapolis, Minn, April 29, 2011

Media Contact: pr@serotek.com 612.246.4818 Ext. 104

Words without boundaries, Serotek’s DocuScan Plus OCR Goes Multi-Platform With Support For The Mac
Serotek Corporation

the leading provider of accessible, multi-platform cloud-based solutions, is proud to announce the availability of DocuScan Plus for the Apple
AAPL Macintosh

platform.
DocuScan Plus, released for the
Microsoft Windows

platform in November 2010, allows individuals with a computer and attached imaging device to scan and convert printed materials in to text, and to store these documents in the cloud for easy retrieval on either Operating System from anywhere. The newly released Mac application contains the same compelling features as found in its wildly successful Windows counterpart, including easy conversion to daisy, Braille and MP3 formats, sending to
Amazon Kindle

password protection options, and saving to a local computer in large print or Rich Text Format. DocuScan Plus represents the first fully accessible cloud-based OCR solution to be available in the Mac app store.
“When we designed DocuScan Plus for Windows with cloud-based features, bringing it to the Mac was the next logical step,” said Mike Calvo, CEO. “People don’t use just one computer, or even one operating system anymore, and they need to access their information regardless of which platform they’re using at any given time.” “Apple has a host of accessibility features already built in to the operating system,” continued Calvo. “Because of this, we were able to make an application that is universally compelling in its own right, regardless of whether you’re print-disabled, and its accessible right out of the box to a very wide audience.”
DocuScan Plus is designed with an easy and intuitive interface, and works seamlessly with Apple’s Voiceover screen reader and Zoom magnifier. The application can be used in conjunction with the wide variety of Braille displays which are supported with Voiceover. The $299 price for this service provides users the ability to utilize DocuScan Plus on both the Windows and Mac platforms without paying a premium. This unique  approach continues  Serotek’s philosophy of offering accessibility anywhere at an affordable price, which is unparalleled in the Assistive Technology Industry.
The app is now [available through the Mac App Store,

and you can learn more about the revolutionary DocuScan Plus by visiting
www.docuscanplus.com

Serotek Corporation
Serotek Corporation is a leading technology company that develops software and manufactures accessibility solutions under the System Access brand. Committed to the mission of providing accessibility anywhere, Serotek began with the launch of the first online community specifically designed to meet the needs of people with visual impairment. Since then, Serotek has introduced several powerful, affordable solutions that require minimal training and investment. For more information, visit www.serotek.com

Media Contact: pr@serotek.com 612.246.4818, Ext. 104

Technical Contact: info@serotek.com

Words without boundaries, Serotek’s DocuScan Plus OCR Goes
Multi-Platform With Support For The Mac

Michael Lauf
Fri, 29 Apr 2011 19:10:00 GMT


Filed under: Assistive Tech, Blind, Low Vision, Mac, OCR, Product Information, Product News, Software, Text to Speech
Categories: Accessibility

Local ENT Doctor(s) Offers Tips For Preventing Noise-Induced Hearing Loss

AccessTech News - Mon, 05/02/2011 - 08:19

 

Nationwide, 10 million Americans suffer from irreversible noise-induced hearing loss, with 30 million more exposed to dangerous noise levels each day. For children and teenagers, one of the simplest ways that they can acquire noise-induced hearing loss is by listening to loud music…

Local ENT Doctor(s) Offers Tips For Preventing Noise-Induced Hearing Loss
Mon, 02 May 2011 07:00:00 GMT


Filed under: Health Watch, Hearing Loss, Prevention
Categories: Accessibility

Got a Complaint?

AccessTech News - Mon, 05/02/2011 - 08:17

 

Got a problem with captioning? There’s a site that will take your comment and make sure it gets to the right TV network, local station, cable or satellite provider that needs to hear it. CaptionsON is an effort by VITAC – one of the largest providers of captioning in the country. The company hopes the website and accompanying video will help people understand how important the service is to viewers.

Read More at DeafNewsToday.com

Got a Complaint?
Deaf News Today
Mon, 02 May 2011 13:00:00 GMT


Filed under: Captioning, Deaf, Hard of Hearing, Video
Categories: Accessibility

A newcomer’s guide to Ubuntu Linux

AccessTech News - Mon, 05/02/2011 - 07:47

 

PC Advisor decided to throw me in at the deep end, tasking me with getting to grips with Ubuntu Light. It wanted to know whether Ubuntu really was as user-friendly for Linux novices as enthusiasts would have you believe. More here

A newcomer’s guide to Ubuntu Linux
cj2003
Sat, 30 Apr 2011 11:41:47 GMT


Filed under: Guide, Linux Tip, Tech Tip, Tips and Tricks
Categories: Accessibility

How to get Speed Dial in Firefox

AccessTech News - Mon, 05/02/2011 - 07:45

 

While it’s got Sync, tabs on top, and a menu button, Firefox still lacks one feature that all the other major browsers have in one form or another: the "speed dial". Originally from Opera, the feature is the visual implementation of your most recently or most frequently visited Web sites on the new tab page. Firefox add-ons have stepped up to fill the dial void, but implementation in each is uneven.

Speed Dial 0.9.5.8

(Credit: Screenshot by Seth Rosenblatt/CNET)

Speed Dial 0.9.5.8 (download) is the most robust of the four add-ons we’re looking at today. It’s highly customizable, offering the deep range of customizations that come with the best Firefox add-ons. Among the multitude of choices is the option to control whether it opens in new tabs or new windows; set the number of "dials," create dial groups and hook them to hot key combinations for quick launching; and customize the look of each dial’s thumbnail. It comes with a default weather dial in the number one position, although you can change that.

It has two problems, though. One is that it lacks the ability to automatically read your most frequently visited Web sites or most recently visited Web sites, which means that it requires your input before the dials get created, and the dials will never "learn" from your browsing habits. The second is that it appeared to slow down the browser’s behavior slightly.

AutoDial 9

(Credit: Screenshot by Seth Rosenblatt/CNET)

Auto Dial 9 (download) goes in the opposite direction. It looks solely at your most frequently visited and most recently visited Web sites, and provides little in the way of ancillary customizations. There are some tweaks that are available in about:config after you install the add-on, and the extension’s More Info page in the add-ons manager provides details on those. They are not an impressive set of customizations, though, dealing with button size and row width.

When you mouse over a link, which have been arranged in a slightly chaotic text cluster with inconsistent favicon support, a red X appears in the corner. Click it to remove the link from the list. While I like the concept of a pure frequently and recently visited list, this particular implementation is too disorganized to be overly useful.

Fast Dial 3.4

(Credit: Screenshot by Seth Rosenblatt/CNET)

Fast Dial 3.4 (download) behaves similarly to Speed Dial, but with fewer customization options. It also lacks the frequently and recently visited automation, and I actually had to restart the browser twice before it would show up in a new "new tab" page. You can add a new dial by right-clicking on an Web site you’re currently looking at, and choosing the Fast Dial option. Or from a new tab, double-click on the dial and you can manually add a site. When getting started, I found that adding the toolbar button made accessing the dial page much easier than without it. It does let you do things like expand the grid, and set a custom favicon and URL, small tweaks that some may appreciate. It didn’t present any of the performance hang-ups that can annoy in Speed Dial.

Sugestron Speed Dial 0.9.12

(Credit: Screenshot by Seth Rosenblatt/CNET)

The add-on that most closely resembles speed dial implementation in other browsers is Sugestron Speed Dial 0.9.12. It’s limited to eight dials, and it has kludgy, awkwardly large icons for pinning sites to the dial and removing them. However, it does read your history accurately for frequently visited and recently visited sites. In fact, it’s so accurate it’ll pick up on visits to internal browser tools like the add-ons manager (about:addons).

If you’re looking for a simple port of the basic dial features in your speed dial add-on, Sugestron’s version is the way to go. Otherwise, Speed Dial offers the in-depth options that most people will want, while Fast Dial can provide you with a lightweight alternative to Speed Dial.

Got a favorite Firefox dialer? Tell me in the comments below.

How to get Speed Dial in Firefox
Seth Rosenblatt
Sat, 30 Apr 2011 00:57:26 GMT


Filed under: Browser Tip, How to, Tech Tip, Tips and Tricks
Categories: Accessibility

Android file syncer face-off: Dropbox vs. SugarSync

AccessTech News - Mon, 05/02/2011 - 07:43

 

Among the growing list of services dedicated to syncing and storing your files in the cloud, there are two that consistently register as top dogs: Dropbox and SugarSync. Both offer comprehensive (and different) suites of syncing and sharing tools, both have their benefits and drawbacks, and both offer free Android apps. Let’s take a look at what each of these apps offers in the way of mobile file-syncing.

When looking at a mobile application as an extension of a greater program or service, there are a few things it’s important to keep in mind. First, how well does the app perform its core functions? Second, how does it take advantage of mobile-specific tools and contexts? And third, is it stable and secure in a mobile environment? Considering these criteria and others, let’s see what each of our two subjects brings to the table.

(Credit: Dropbox)

(Credit: Dropbox)

Dropbox for Android is simple. It’s your good old magic Dropbox folder, but on your mobile device. Cleanly designed and straightforward, the app makes it easy to upload and delete files, or create new files using your phone’s camera, audio recorder, notepad, and so on.

For the well-connected among us, it’s also great for sharing files (or links to files) through e-mail, text message, Twitter, Facebook, WordPress, or whatever else you’ve got installed. In this regard, Dropbox makes fantastic use of the applications available on your mobile device. And as a plus, there’s a security password option in case your Dropbox folder contains sensitive information and your phone falls into the wrong hands.

Overall, Dropbox for Android performs its core functions perfectly and without any stability issues. It integrates well with your mobile device’s hardware, plays extremely well with other installed applications, and offers some extra security.

(Credit: SugarSync)

(Credit: SugarSync)

Meanwhile, SugarSync for Android is slightly more involved, since the SugarSync service itself offers so many more syncing options than its rival. It doesn’t revolve around a single carry-all folder the way Dropbox does. Rather, SugarSync allows you to pick and choose any folders on any of your devices to sync, which means tons of flexibility, especially with the built-in Android File Manager. As a whole, it may not be as simple as Dropbox’s app, but it’s certainly more feature-packed.

And then there’s the AutoSync Photos option, which, if you’re an avid phone photographer, is awesome, to say the least. Enable it, and every time you snap a photo it’ll automatically get backed up in the cloud–all in the background, without any pop-up confirmations.

Overall, SugarSync is a powerful app with a built-in File Manager and a really nifty AutoSync tool. While we did experience a few stability problems when testing AutoSync, for the most part it performed solidly, and is a worthwhile download.

Now, remember–while both Dropbox and SugarSync offer powerful suites of services that likely satisfy different file-syncing needs in different ways, this comparison is about their respective Android applications. So what’s the verdict? If you’re looking for a way to automatically back up photos as you take them, SugarSync is a no-brainer choice. Otherwise, Dropbox appears to be the simpler and more stable and secure file-syncing option for Android users. But hey, if you still can’t decide, why not just download them both?

Originally posted at Android Atlas

Android file syncer face-off: Dropbox vs. SugarSync
Jaymar Cabebe
Fri, 29 Apr 2011 17:56:34 GMT


Filed under: Android, App Review, Comparison
Categories: Accessibility

iCloud Found in OS X Lion Under ‘Castle’ Codename

AccessTech News - Mon, 05/02/2011 - 07:26

 

Hints of Apple’s upcoming cloud-based storage service – now dubbed iCloud following the company’s takeover of the iCloud.com domain – have been found within the third release of the Mac OS X Lion developer preview under the ‘Castle’ codename.

First discovered by Consomac.fr is a ‘Find My Mac’ feature thought to offer the same functionality as the ‘Find My iPhone’ feature built into MobileMe. What’s more interesting, however, are the strings that indicate users can upgrade from MobileMe to a service called ‘Castle.’

‘Castle’ is believed to be the codename for iCloud – the cloud-based storage service that Apple is currently developing. The service is expected to offer users a way of storing their music and other content in a digital locker, which they can then stream to internet connected devices such as the iPhone and iPad, and save storage space which would usually be taken up by storing content locally.

The service got its ‘iCloud’ name after Apple purchased the domain from a Swedish company called Xcerion, who offer a similar storage service. Xcerion received $4.5 million to rebrand the service and give up the iCloud.com domain.

iCloud Found in OS X Lion Under ‘Castle’ Codename
Mon, 02 May 2011 10:39:12 GMT


Filed under: Mac News
Categories: Accessibility

First White iPhone 4 Teardowns Reveal Modified Proximity Sensor, Camera Lens

AccessTech News - Mon, 05/02/2011 - 07:24

 

As with any new Apple product, shortly after its release the white iPhone 4 received a customary teardown to see what’s inside. You’d be forgiven for thinking the internals for the white device are exactly the same as those featured within its black counterpart, but surely Apple changed something while it was delayed for all those months?

Well, the first teardowns for the new device reveal changes to both the proximity sensor and the rear-facing camera lens. One of the rumored issues which caused the white handset’s delay was light leakage into the camera; it seems Apple has rectified this issue with a more recessed camera lens.

As you can see in the comparison photo (top), the camera lens on the white device on the right is embedded much deeper into its surround, when compared to the lens featured on the black device on the left.

As for the proximity sensor, these are also different on each device, however, it’s currently unclear how the two components differ. Its obvious from recent images of the white iPhone 4 that Apple has modified the design of the proximity sensor externally: what was once tiny little holes above the device’s speaker is now a much more pronounced opening.

These changes have obviously been made to tackle the issues with the device that caused Apple a 10-month delay in bringing it to market. Issues with both the camera and proximity sensor were rumored long before the device’s release.

[via AppleInsider]

First White iPhone 4 Teardowns Reveal Modified Proximity Sensor, Camera Lens
Mon, 02 May 2011 10:39:11 GMT


Filed under: Apple News, iPhone
Categories: Accessibility

Blackberry Playbook Review

AccessTech News - Mon, 05/02/2011 - 07:20

 

Despite its Adobe Flash support, the BlackBerry Playbook is not the most anticipated tablet on the market, due to its small size (7-inch) and the relatively small number of applications available on its new OS when compared to major competitors such as iOS and Android.

However, I personally like the design, the user interface, and the screen quality – very much. The device also has the reputation to deliver very good multitasking performance, which was surprising for a BlackBerry device. That’s thanks to the Playbook brand new OS, which is based on QNX OS, and to the Dual Core TI OMAP 4430 system on a chip (Soc).

The Blackberry Playbook is positioned as a consumer device which also offers advanced security features designed to appeal to RIM’s traditional enterprise customers.

Blackberry Playbook Review, By Ubergizmo. Top Stories : EVO Shift 4G Review, MacBook Air Review,

 

Blackberry Playbook Review
Eliane Fiolet
Mon, 02 May 2011 09:40:16 GMT


Filed under: Review, Tablets
Categories: Accessibility

Time Inc. In iPad Deal With Apple (Russell Adams/Wall Street Journal)

AccessTech News - Mon, 05/02/2011 - 07:10

 

Russell Adams / Wall Street Journal:
Time Inc. In iPad Deal With Apple  —  Time Inc., the country’s largest magazine publisher, has reached a deal with Apple Inc. (AAPL) to make all its iPad editions free for print subscribers, marking a break in the impasse between publishers and Apple and lending support to Time’s contention …

Time Inc. In iPad Deal With Apple (Russell Adams/Wall Street Journal)
Mon, 02 May 2011 01:00:28 GMT


Filed under: App News, iPad, Magazines
Categories: Accessibility

Apple to Roll Out New iMacs? [REPORT]

AccessTech News - Mon, 05/02/2011 - 07:07

 

 

At last, Apple will refresh its line of iMac all-in-one computers, adding the latest Intel Core i5/i7 “Sandy Bridge” architecture and that new Thunderbolt port, according to reliable sources.

The multiple sources, which AppleInsider indicates have all been reliable in the past, say the new models will be rolled out on Tuesday, May 3, immediately after Apple announces them.

Apple is late with this iMac update. The first PCs with the new chips and associated architecture (that we tested here) rolled out in January, 2011, and Apple shipped its MacBooks using the new Sandy Bridge architecture shortly thereafter. However, Apple delayed upgrading the hardware in its line of iMacs, which haven’t been refreshed since July 27, 2010.

Even though the iMacs will be tardy to the new processor game, this time Apple got lucky by delaying its rollout of the new architecture for its all-in-one desktops. In late January, Intel announced a flaw in its new Sandy Bridge architecture, causing it to stop shipments of certain motherboards and recall and replace some of those already shipped.

Let us know in the comments if this upgrade to Sandy Bridge and Thunderbolt will make you more likely to buy an iMac.

Via AppleInsider

Apple to Roll Out New iMacs? [REPORT]
Charlie White
Sun, 01 May 2011 20:02:18 GMT


Filed under: Apple Rumors
Categories: Accessibility

Google Talk Enables Video Chat On Android Smartphones

AccessTech News - Mon, 05/02/2011 - 06:53

 

Google recently launched Google Talk with video and voice chat for Android phones. With the service, users will be able to video or voice chat with their friends and family directly from an Android phone. Calls can be placed over 3G, 4G and Wi-Fi connections. According to Google, the new features will first roll out to the Nexus S phones over…

Google Talk Enables Video Chat On Android Smartphones
Mon, 02 May 2011 03:59:27 GMT


Filed under: Android, Google News, Video Chat, VOIP
Categories: Accessibility

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 403

AccessTech News - Mon, 05/02/2011 - 06:49

 

This week in DistroWatch Weekly: Reviews: Gaming with Trine News: OMG! Ubuntu! publishes Unity guide, Lubuntu nears "official" status, Mageia releases first live CDs, interview with wattOS’ Ronald Ropp Questions and answers: Choosing the right distribution and software Released last week: Ubuntu 11.04, Slackware Linux 13.37, OpenBSD 4.9….

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 403
Mon, 02 May 2011 09:00:02 GMT


Filed under: Linux News
Categories: Accessibility
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